© 2019 by Dynamix Physical Therapy

I am a Southern California girl, born and raised. I have always been an active person and jumped into any sport or activity that I could get involved with while growing up. I am a big believer in team sports and everything you can learn from them. I love any sort of competition and am always up for a challenge. I think these factors are a major part of who I am today and why I chose to become a PTA.


I received my bachelor’s degree in Biological Sciences from UC Santa Barbara and spent 4 years reinforcing my will power by fighting the urge to spend every day on the beach. I received my PTA degree from Loma Linda University where I was blessed with the chance to learn and develop my love for physical therapy and for people as a whole. I have been lucky enough to spend the last 3 years combining my passion for helping people with my love for activity by teaching people how to improve their quality of life and return to what they miss doing most.  


I enjoy travelling and dream of exploring the world as much as I can. I like to experience new places, cultures, and especially new foods. I enjoy cooking and baking but my favorite part is the eating. It’s impossible to keep me out of the sunshine and the fresh air during my free time. Most days off, you can find me either with friends and family or walking through the neighborhood parks with my pup Grady as he enjoys his favorite activity - chasing squirrels.

Do you suffer from headaches, grinding of your teeth, clicking of your jaw or even ear pain? These can all be signs of Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) syndrome, also known as the temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD). This is a disorder of the jaw muscles and nerves caused by injury to the TMJ, which is the joint between your jaw and skull. The injured temporomandibular joint leads to pain with chewing; clicking, and popping of the jaw; swelling on the sides of the face; nerve inflammation; headaches; tooth grinding; and sometimes dislocation of the temporomandibular joint.

What causes TMJ syndrome?

Multiple factors contribute to the muscle tightness and dysfunction that characterize this condition. Most often, poor posture and neck alignment change the pull of the muscles that make your jaw move. This causes painful grinding and irritation of the TMJ.

 

Other causes may include:

  • Poor alignment of or trauma to the teeth or jaw

  • Teeth grinding

  • Poor posture

  • Stress

  • Arthritis or other inflammatory musculoskeletal disorders

  • Excessive gum chewing

A lot can be done to help TMJ, first starting with a thorough evaluation of your problem with our expert physical therapists. Once the root cause of your problem has been discovered, a comprehensive plan can be developed to quickly relieve your pain and restore natural movement to your TMJ.

The focus of physical therapy for TMJ is relaxation, stretching, and releasing tight muscles and scar tissue. In most cases physical therapy can resolve TMJ and prevent the need for surgery. However, in cases where surgery is absolutely necessary, physical therapy is a vital part of the recovery process, as it helps minimize scar tissue formation, muscle tightness and allows for a complete recovery.

Temporomandibular Joint